Scammers Compromise Over 100 Sites in Apple Phishing Campaign

 

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A new phishing campaign is involved in the compromising of over 100 websites across the
net. They are hosting fake login pages asking for Apple IDs and passwords and are linked to in spam messages. This scam has been around in various forms for a long time, but researchers have recently detected a sharp spike in activity. All 110 hacked sites are hosted on an IP registered to a single ISP in Houston, and still have not been cleaned up. It’s unclear if the ISP is aware of the problem. To date there are nearly 350 known phishing sites related to Apple.

The messages are typical of phishing emails, with generic greetings and sign offs, horrible grammar and broken English. Tech savvy recipients won’t fall for the notification that their Apple account is about to expire and their info needs to be audited, but the urgency of the message could possibly trick less knowledgeable users who might panic at the thought of their account being shut down.

Once the scammers have succeeded in getting someone to turn over their Apple ID and billing info, they can use it to go on a shopping spree at the Apple Store, impersonate you and possibly wipe your Apple devices, steal data stored in iCloud and even blackmail you. They can also use your credit card info elsewhere or sell it to another scammer. To protect yourself, take advantage of the new two-step verification Apple recently implemented, and never click on links in email asking for your info.

Written by Sue Walsh

0 Comments

  1. Lisa S. · May 4, 2013

    Sorry, Apple fans but this campaign is just targeting the stupid. Probably scammers know if you have a brain you won’t buy these overpriced rotten apples and this makes you an easy victim. Still, it’s bad to hear that scammers have found a new niche to exploit.

  2. Rosanna · May 16, 2013

    “…horrible grammar and broken English…” This should be enough to generate suspicion. After all, will Apple really send you this kind of message? Ah, but, yes, I agree that there are still a number of users who remain ignorant about these things. Perhaps Apple can send a clarification email and ensure its users that they won’t be losing their accounts? Then again, as always, the best thing to do is never give your Apple ID and personal information to anyone. You can also verify the email’s authenticity with Apple. I’ve done that a couple of times and it always worked!

  3. Teg · May 18, 2013

    Sorry, Apple fans but this campaign is just targeting the stupid. Probably scammers know if you have a brain you won’t buy these overpriced rotten apples and this makes you an easy victim. Still, it’s bad to hear that scammers have found a new niche to exploit.

  4. Teg · May 18, 2013

    Sorry, Apple fans but this campaign is just targeting the stupid. Probably scammers know if you have a brain you won’t buy these overpriced rotten apples and this makes you an easy victim. Still, it’s bad to hear that scammers have found a new niche to exploit.

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